What do Brazilian Admirals want? Not a quiet expansion!

The Swiss blog Offiziere.ch has recently published a piece by Paul Pryce, analysing the Brazilian Navy’s current endeavours whilst trying to figure out what bearing it is sailing. Pryce evaluates the ‘quiet expansion’ of the Brazilian Navy, and whilst he delivers a brief but sound level of analysis, he fails to deliver an accurate reading of some of the key underlying issues. These issues include the ‘military industrial compound’ dimension of the Navy, the often unspoken aspects of civil-military relations in Brazil and the competition for budget between branches.

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Indonesia’s empowered military: hedging and trust in interstate relations

In the growing literature about how to identify the presence or absence of trust, Keating and Ruzicka have written an extremely persuasive paper on the role of hedging as an indicator of a trusting relationship[1]. Whilst the article provides an extremely important framework for analysing the dimension of hedging as an indicator of trusting relationships, however, it highlights a common problematic occurrence in the analysis of trust; the assumption that states are the primary referent for trust, and that states as a whole are responsible for any hedging behaviour.

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The Israeli clampdown in the West Bank

Winner of our ‘Trust, Diplomacy and Conflict Transformation’ blog competition.

Clampdown in the West Bank

Last week, Netanyahu’s speech in congress dominated the headlines from Israel/Palestine, but increased pressure on the Palestinian Authority (PA) could be reaching a boiling point. The withholding of Palestinian tax funds by Israel as well as power cuts imposed without warning on vast parts of the West Bank are putting relative stability at risk.

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The Importance of Being Earnest: The P5 Process and the 2015 NPT Review Conference

August 2015 will mark the 70th anniversary of the dropping of two atomic bombs, on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. While the risk of nuclear war may be low in today’s world, contemporary scenarios and risks, such as state failure or a terrorist takeover, present new dangers that increase the possibility of inadvertent or accidental nuclear use. Continue reading The Importance of Being Earnest: The P5 Process and the 2015 NPT Review Conference

A blog from the Institute for Conflict, Cooperation and Security